Sunspots

American Total Solar Eclipse Photos

Posted on Updated on

This is the first portion of photos me and my wife took during the American Solar Eclipse, August 21st, 2017 at Corvallis in Oregon. I’ll keep posting more photos as time goes and as I find more time in order to process them from their original format in my cameras.

Here are some of the total solar eclipse photos. To the left is the diamond ring while on the right is the totality. Note a couple of prominences (fire flares) showing in the edges of the sun on the top but also the moon’s surface doesn’t appear to be perfect round because of the mountains and valleys in its surface.

We met many interesting and friendly people from Kenya (the country), Phoenix Arizona, San Fransisco bay area, Arkansas, Texas and other cities in California. If you guys read this please comment or send me an email with your names so I can add you here!

Among all of them we also had Jodie Smalley coming up to us, asking if we could take some photos while she breathed fire during the totality of the eclipse. My wife went off with her at a place without grass to record that awesome idea she had (watch the fire breathing video below were Melissa talks also about the shadows on the ground).

Below you’ll find some of our videos and photos while we were preparing to start documenting this amazing event!

To my surprise Youtube has stopped offering the ability to add annotations in your videos anymore, as mobile devices don’t support them. Annoying as you can’t add corrections or additional comments to the narrative sound in the background. But according to Google 60% of the users are using mobile devices to watch these videos, which is quite remarkable. However, just before the eclipse I shouted “ring of fire” which is the wrong technical term. Obviously, I meant to say “diamond ring” instead.

A ring of fire is the maximum of an annular eclipse. Now, annular eclipses are the ones when the moon is further away from the earth hence it doesn’t cover the entire sun. An annular eclipse is around the corner and will happen October 14, 2023 and you can see it from northern California.

After the 2023 annular eclipse and If you’ve also missed the 2017 total eclipse, there’s one more chance in 2024 in Texas.

 

Here are some photos from my friend and colleague Akash Garg who was in Sacramento, California at our work area. Even though the eclipse was partial in Sacramento, he could still see the crescent-shaped shadows on the ground from trees and other objects.

Niklas Henricson

Venus Transit 2012

Posted on Updated on

Planning on the Venus transit was a major disappointment when we weren’t sure if it was either or a go or not.
The initial weather forecasts and satellite images showed increasingly chances of precipitation and thick coverage of clouds.
Thus, we didn’t have any expectations and didn’t get overly overexcited just yet. We simply didn’t hope in anything at all.

Venus Transit by Niklas Henricson
Venus Transit by Niklas Henricson

Arne and Rolf dropped by my house and worked together mounting new solar filters to our telescopes. We used Müllar-filter, which blocks visual light to a very high extend. Once we left my place around 3:30 AM we had a 1½ hour by car to northern part of Skåne where we would meet the rest of the Aquila Astronomy club members. Once we arrived approximately at 5:00 AM, the sun raised since long time ago and the transit was already on-going. We rushed quickly out of the car, equipped with just with my Megrez 72, my Canon EOS 50D DSLR camera and an ordinary tripod. Everything was installed quickly away from the crowd that was looking fascinated by the spectacle through their own telescopes.

There was no rain and the sun was heating our faces. It was truly beautiful with just a few small clouds positioned very low along the horizon but yet close by the sunrise, but for the most part, it was a clear light blue sky with a barely noticeable light breeze from the sea.

As I looked through my ocular I was amazed to see Venus devotedly followed her orbit around of our beautiful star. I was captured by an amazing and indescribable feeling of fascination and excitement. You could really sense the slow motion of the planet, moving quietly across the sun disc like a faithful partner around it’s bright majestic star.

This was one of my best observations so far. I need to top that by observing a total solar eclipse in the future!

Sunspot observation

Posted on Updated on

sunspots 1195, 1196, 1193
sunspots 1195, 1196, 1193

Enjoying Easter holidays with a bright shiny and sunny day with my telescope. Considering it has been very nice weather during the entire holidays here in Sweden, this must have been the best as there are two sunspots appearing on the surface of the sun (1195, 1196 and 1193).

This image was taken by using a Mülar filter installed infront of my refractor (William Optics Fluorostar 110 FLT APO) at ISO 100, shutter speed 1/800, WB: 7500 K and was processed with curves and levels adjustments in Adobe Photoshop.

The sun through Mylar filter

Posted on Updated on

The sun through Mylar filter
The sun through Mylar filter

Mylar filter blocks most of the visible light spectra (up to 99.9%) in difference to an H-alpha (see my previous blog entry). If you want to manage observing sun spots cost efficiently and cheap then Mylar filter would do the job for you. Although an H-alpha filter would provide you with more details such as solar prominences, the Mylar filter is just allowing you to watch the sun’s cromosphere and there fore just sunspots. However, since this filter is lightweighted, can be carried easily around and can be mounted on ordinary camera lenses that would allow you to witness a Venus/Mercurius passages or a solar eclipse if you want to travel somewhere without carrying around heavy telescope equipment.

I personally prefer Baader’s astrosolar filter due to good quality. A Mylar filter must be kept dry and in room temperature if you want it to be long lived. It is nessesary to inspect your filter before attaching it on your telescope/camera lens since even a small pinhole can damage your eyes permanently during observation, without even noticing!

The best way to inspect your filter before using it, is by placing it infront of a flash light in a dark room. That way you would easily be able to spot any damage on it’s surface.

To photograph the sun doesn’t only require you to have the right settings on your camera, but you have to take multiple shots in order to get a clear shot spared from atmospherical distortions which are more intense and common during daytime. Most astrophotographers are using explicitly a web camera to shoot planetary objects, allowing them to get rid of unwanted images by running the video sequence through a software such as Registax. I’ve got a Youtube video showing you how these atmospherical distortions look like, by clicking here (Beware of the sound).

The image above shows the sun spots 1161 and 1162 as they appeared on Sunday 21 February 2011. Canon EOS 50D, ISO 250, Shutter speed 1/8000, WB: Custom, William Optics Megrez 72 Doublet APO, Image was processed in Adobe PS.

The Sun through H-alpha

Posted on Updated on

Less then 48 hours left before the partial solar eclipse that occurs during the tuesday morning 2011-01-04. I was testing my equipment and saw that there were a few sunspots. The image is photographed with a Canon EOS 50D at ISO 800 through a Lunt LS60THa H-alpha telescope.

The news have already been requesting curiously on details about the partial solar eclipse on tuesday. Regardless the weather conditions we will be there taking care of our guests and giving interviews. If the weather allow us to observe anything I promise to get back here with some photos.

More newspapers publishing about the solar eclipse on tuesday: