Saturn

Sharing the passion for astronomy and astrophotography

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July 30th, 2020 was the International Friendship Day and I had the pleasure to meet Maxx, Sunita and their friends by having our own little star party. We had a short walkthrough on the main summer constellations and the ancient Greek tales behind them (the stories behind king Lyacon, Callisto and her son Arcas, Cassiopeia, Andromeda, Medusa, Kraken and Perseus, Hercules and the serpent dragon Draco) We spoke a little bit about the constellation of Scorpio sent by goddess of hunting Artemis that bit Orion.

Planets Saturn (aka Kronos in ancient Greek mythology, son of Uranus and Gaia or Earth) and Jupiter (aka Zeus in ancient Greek mythology) were very prominent and right above the meridian, as well as the moon

Transparency: Transparent (Above Average)
Seeing: Poor 2/5
Darkness: Magnitude 5.0 (Moon altitude 26.5 degrees)
Wind: 0 – 5 mph
Humidity: 40% to 50%
Temperature: 68F to 77F degrees
Elevation: 5283 ft.

We used the cellphones and photographed the moon, Saturn and Jupiter through afocal method by aligning the cell phone cameras in the eyepiece field of view.

Niklas Henricson

Object casts shadow over Saturn’s rings

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Foto: NASA
Photo: NASA

Since the time Galileo pointed his telescope toward Saturn, every observer has been fascinated about the rings. They are mainly made of ice, grain and rocks of different sizes and shapes – some as big as cars – moving around Saturn and colliding with each other constantly causing them to be torn apart into smaller pieces. The rings are what remain from a moon in the past. Gravitational forces between the two objects (gas giant and its satellite) caused the object to be ripped into smaller parts during the ages. Today the remnants left from that moon are an astonishing beautiful sight that appears to us as rings.

The same kind of “war declaration” is claimed between Jupiter and its moon Io. Moons too close to these extremely large gas giant planets will cause them to slowly be torn apart over time. Currently Io has violent volcano and moon-quake activities ripping it slowly from the inside. One day Jupiter may have as beautiful rings as Satun. Who knows?

Photo: NASA
Photo: NASA

Rocks orbiting Saturn sometimes fall out of their orbits due to large collisions between the rocks, causing the shadows we see on the image, before they fall back again into orbit. Aftonbladet reports this news as mystical as in “Mysterious object in Saturn’s rings“, which it actually is not. Sometimes I admit that they add a little bit of a spice in their news with overdramatized titles.

Aftonbladet article: Mystiskt föremål i Saturnus ring ( http://www.aftonbladet.se/nyheter/article5641347.ab )

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